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Guidance and Tools

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance

Drinking Water in Schools & Child Care Facilities

This one-stop EPA site provides information about drinking water quality in schools and child care facilities. Ensuring drinking water quality at these facilities is important because that’s where children spend their day, and they are likely to drink water while they are there.

http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/drinkingwater/schools/

Schools and child care centers can find a wealth of information to assist them in their efforts to improve water quality in their facilities. EPA has published guidance on reducing lead in drinking water.

Some schools and child care facilities who meet the definition of a public water system are regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). If your facility regularly provides water for human consumption to an average of at least 25 individuals a day AND:

  • You have your own water source (i.e., a well)
  • You treat the water
  • You sell the water

you meet the definition of a public water system and you must comply with the provisions of the SDWA. Your state drinking water program makes this designation. http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/drinkingwater/schools/guidance.cfm

How to Collect an Initial (First Draw) Sample Lead in Drinking Water – What You Should Know to Protect Children in Your School or Child Care Facility

3Ts Guidance and Toolkit

Drinking Water Best Management Practices for Schools and Child Care Facilities with their Own Drinking Water Sources – EPA 816-B-13-001 April 2013

Drinking Water Best Management Practices for Schools and Child Care Facilities Served by Municipal Water Systems – EPA 816-B-13-002 April 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

National Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACLPP)

The ACLPP released a report to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which acknowledged the cumulative scientific evidence concerning a range of health impacts associated with blood lead levels less than 10µg/dL in children. The ACLPP recommendations and the CDC responses can be found on the CDC website at:

ACLPP Report: Low Level Lead Exposure Harms Children: A Renewed Call for Primary Prevention

Drinking Water Best Management Practices for Schools and Child Care Facilities with their Own Drinking Water Sources – EPA 816-B-13-001 April 2013

CDC Response to ACLPP Recommendations in Low Level Lead Exposure Harms Children: Low Level Lead Exposure Harms Children: A Renewed Call for Primary Prevention

Specific recommendations that were made by the ACLPP and accepted by the CDC were to:

  1. Base blood lead re-testing requirements and timelines on a ‘reference value’ of 5 µg/dL
  2. Have clinicians take the primary role in educating families about preventing childhood lead exposure during well-child visits prior to blood lead testing occurring.

World Health Organization (WHO) Guidance

  • Lead in Drinking-water – Background document for development of WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality – WHO/SDE/WSH/03.04?09/Rev1