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Flight Medic Course

Naval Aerospace Flight Surgeon Course

  • Target Audience: Volunteer Commissioned U.S. Navy Medical Corps officers or be sponsored by a foreign military service. Must meet physical qualifications per MANMED, including eyesight correctable to 20/20 in both eyes, normal depth perception and normal color vision. Current flight physical examination must be reviewed and candidate found physically qualified and aeronautically adaptable for DIFOPS by Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) prior to acceptance for training. Must pass a screening Navy PRT with score of "Good-Low" (running), be within weight/body fat standards for height, and within aviation weight limits of 103-245 pounds upon check-in.  Swimming proficiency required for water survival qualifications.
  • Purpose: To provide training leading to designation as a Naval Flight Surgeon. Students develop professional competency in aerospace physiology and medicine, human factors in aviation, aviation safety, mishap investigation, occupational health and preventive medicine. Traditional clinical medicine specialties including internal medicine, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and psychiatry are taught in the context of the aviation environment so that students learn the appropriate disposition for aviators and aircrew with medical problems. Flight training gives the student firsthand experience in the stresses of the aviation environment.
  • Course Review: The mission of the Student Naval Flight Surgeon Course is to develop the knowledge, skill and self-confidence essential to provide optimal aeromedical support of fleet aviation units in remote environments with scarce medical resources. Students shall further develop their skills in clinical medicine, with emphasis on cardiology, neuropsychiatry, optometry/ophthalmology and otolaryngology. As aerospace medicine is primarily preventive, students shall also develop their skills in occupational and environmental medicine, aviation safety, mishap prevention/investigation, and crash survivability assessment. In order to develop a strong identification with and an appreciation of the physiological and psychological stressors inherent in the naval aviation operation environment, students shall demonstrate their aeronautical adaptability by completing primary flight training.

    The course consists of three phases which are academics, aviation pre-flight indoctrination and primary flight training. The academic phase is subdivided into administrative, environmental physiology, operational medicine, and clinical medicine units. Physiology qualifications, water and land survival training, physical readiness testing and ground school subjects are completed in the pre-flight phase.
  • Length: 166 days
  • Classes/yr:03
  • Seats/yr: 105 (Please note: of this 105 per year, 6 are AEP, 10 are AOP, 12 are OPH, therefore, depending upon interpretation, that may actually leave 77 seats available per year.)
  • CIN#: B-6A-2100
  • CDP: 9897
  • Location: Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, FL
  • CME/CEU:180
  • American Council on Education (ACE) Credit Recommendation: In the upper-division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in flight physiology, 3 in aviation safety, 3 in community and behavioral medicine, and 4 in aerospace medicine. In the graduate degree, 3 semester hours in aeronautical skills for aerospace physicians.

    Accreditation Statement:The Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC), Continuing Medical Education (CME) Department, Bethesda, Maryland is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for Physicians.
    The Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC) designates this live educational activity for a maximum of (180) AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Disclosure Statement: As a sponsor accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), it is the policy of the Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC) to require the disclosure of the existence of any significant financial interest or any other relationships a faculty member or a sponsor has with the manufacturer(s) or any commercial product(s) discussed in an educational presentation, and also to disclose discussions of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation(s). NMPDC has established policies in place that will identify and resolve all conflicts of interest prior to this educational activity. Detailed disclosure will be made on the date(s) of the activity.
  • Dates: The dates are subject to change without notice. See Flight Schedule for class schedule. 
    *Report no later than 7 days prior to course start date.
  • For more information about NAMI and the training we offer click HERE

Naval Aerospace/Operational Psychologist Course

  • Target Audience: Volunteer Commissioned U.S. Navy Medical Service Corps officers who have completed Officer Development School (CIN P-00-4302) and meet professional qualifications per BUMED or be sponsored by a foreign military service. Must meet physical qualifications per MANMED, including eyesight correctable to 20/20 in both eyes, normal depth perception and normal color vision. Current flight physical examination must be reviewed and candidate found physically qualified and aeronautically adaptable for DIFOPS by Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) prior to acceptance for training. Must pass a screening Navy PRT with score of "Good-Low" (running), be within weight/body fat standards for height, and within aviation weight limits of 103-245 pounds upon check-in. Swimming proficiency required for water survival qualifications.
  • Purpose: Provide training leading to designation as a Naval Aerospace and Operational Physiologist. In order to develop a strong identification with and an appreciation of the physiological and psychological stressors inherent in the naval aviation operation environment, students shall demonstrate their aeronautical adaptability by completing primary flight training. Training to professional competency in, aerospace physiology/medicine, human factors in aviation, aviation safety/mishap investigation and develop skills required to administer training curriculums for aviation and non-aviation personnel in aeromedical aspects of flight, in-flight visual problems, spatial disorientation, emergency egress systems, personal life support equipment, and water survival. Qualify to perform duties as assigned for dynamic physiology training.
  • Course Overview: The course includes naval aviation indoctrination and primary flight training, instruction in aerospace environmental physiology, operational and preventive medicine, medical administration, as well as Aviation Survival Training Center (ASTC) administration, instructor training, and training device watch station qualifications.
    The course consists of four phases which are Navy Instructor Training Course (NITC), aviation pre-flight indoctrination (API), primary flight training in fixed and rotary wing aircraft, and graduate level academics. Physiology qualifications, water and land survival training, physical readiness testing and ground school subjects are completed during the aviation pre-flight phase. The academic portion of training is subdivided into administrative, environmental physiology, operational medicine, and clinical medicine units.
  • Length: 196 days
  • Classes/yr: 03
  • Seats/yr: 12
  • CIN#: B-6H-1300
  • CDP: 9801
  • Location: Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, FL
  • CME/CEU: N/A
  • American Council on Education Credit (ACE) Recommendation: In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in aerospace environmental physiology, 3 in aeronautical skills for aerospace physicians, 3 in flight physiology, and 2 in aviation safety.
  • The dates are subject to change without notice. See Flight Schedule for class schedule.
    *Report no later than 45 days prior to Aeromedical Officer (AMO) course start date if student has not completed Navy Instructor Training Course (NTIC) previously or holds Master Training Specialist (MTS) certification.
  • For more information about NAMI and the training we offer click HERE

Naval Aerospace Experimental Psychologist Course

  • Target Audience: Volunteer Commissioned U.S. Navy Medical Service Corps officers who have completed Officer Development School (CIN P-00-4302) and meet professional qualifications per BUMED or be sponsored by a foreign military service.  Must meet physical qualifications per MANMED, including eyesight correctable to 20/20 in both eyes, normal depth perception and normal color vision.  Current flight physical examination must be reviewed and candidate found physically qualified and aeronautically adaptable for DIFOPS by Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) prior to acceptance for training.  Must pass a screening Navy PRT with score of "Good-Low" (running), be within weight/body fat standards for height, and within aviation weight limits of 103-245 pounds upon check-in. Swimming proficiency required for water survival qualifications.
  • Purpose: Provide training leading to designation as a Naval Aerospace Experimental Psychologist. Students will develop skills in aerospace psychology, with particular emphasis on those areas which are especially pertinent to the aviation environment; vision, human performance, human factors engineering, research and development, test and evaluation techniques, training systems, systems acquisition, and human research regulations. Occupational and environmental medicine, safety, aircraft accident investigation, and crash survivability assessment are also instructional objectives.
  • Course Overview: The course includes naval aviation indoctrination and primary flight training, instruction in aerospace environmental physiology, operational and preventive medicine, medical administration, as well as human performance, human factors engineering, training and simulation, testing, human research in the military, weapon system acquisition, medical psychology, aircraft mishap investigation, and crash survivability assessment.
    The course consists of three phases which are academics, aviation pre-flight indoctrination and primary flight training. The academic phase is subdivided into administrative, environmental physiology, operational medicine, and clinical medicine units. Physiology qualifications, water and land survival training, physical readiness testing and ground school subjects are completed in the pre-flight phase.
  • Length: 166 days
  • Classes/yr: 03
  • Seats/yr: 6
  • CIN#: B-6H-1400
  • CDP: 9802
  • Location:Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, FL
  • CME/CEU: N/A
  • American Council on Education (ACE) Credit Recommendation: In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in aerospace psychology, 3 in aeronautical skills for aerospace physicians, 3 in research design and methodology, 3 in flight physiology, and 2 in aviation safety.
  • Dates:The dates are subject to change without notice. See Flight Schedule for class schedule.
    *Report no later than 7 days prior to course start date.
  • For more information about NAMI and the training we offer click HERE

Naval Aerospace Optometrist Course

  • Target Audience: Volunteer Commissioned U.S. Navy Medical Service Corps Officers (Subspecialty Code 1880) who have completed Officer Development School CIN P-00-4302) and meet professional qualifications per BUMED or be sponsored by a foreign military service. Must meet physical qualifications per MANMED, including eyesight correctable to 20/20 in both eyes, normal depth perception and normal color vision. Current flight physical examination must be reviewed and candidate found physically qualified and aeronautically adaptable for DIFOPS by Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) prior to acceptance for training. Must pass a screening Navy PRT with score of "Good-Low" (running), be within weight/body fat standards for height, and within aviation weight limits of 103-245 pounds upon check-in.  Swimming proficiency required for water survival qualifications.
  • Purpose: Provide knowledge and skills essential for the optimal support of the naval aviation vision programs.
  • Course Overview: The curriculum is divided into four phases. The first week is dedicated to orienting students to NAMI and preparation for training alongside Student Naval Aviators (SNA).The second phase is a six-week pre-flight orientation and ground school at Naval Aviation Schools Command. Also included is basic water survival and aviation physiology training. The third phase exposes student aerospace optometrists to the hazards and stressors of flight from the perspective of the aviator. This phase is accomplished with instruction by Training Air Wing FIVE at NAS Whiting Field, Milton, Florida and Training Air Wing SIX at NAS Pensacola, Pensacola, Florida. The fourth phase clinic rotations at NAMI and didactic training. Topics covered include atmospheric physics, physiologic effects of altitude, biodynamics of acceleration, disorientation and visual illusions of flight, motion sickness, noise and hearing conservation, thermal stress, radiation biology, carrier medicine, aviation life support and ejection systems, night vision and lasers, pilot selection, safety and mishap investigation techniques, human factors, crash survivability, physical standards, exams and waivers, aviation pathology and aeromedical evacuation.
  • Length: 166 days
  • Classes/yr: 03
  • Seats/yr: 12
  • CIN#: B-6H-1401
  • CDP: 7339
  • Location: Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, FL
  • CME/CEU: 74
  • American Council on Education (ACE) Credit Recommendation: N/A
  • Dates: The dates are subject to change without notice. See Flight Schedule for class schedule.
    *Report no later than 7 days prior to course start date.
  • For more information about NAMI and the training we offer click HERE

Naval Aviation Medical Examiner

  • Target Audience: Volunteer Commissioned U.S. Navy Medical Corps officers.
  • Purpose: To provide training leading to designation as a Naval Aviation Medical Examiner (AME). Students develop professional competency in aerospace physiology and medicine, human factors in aviation, occupational health and preventive medicine. Traditional clinical medicine specialties including internal medicine, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and psychiatry are taught in the context of the aviation environment so that students learn the appropriate disposition for aviators and aircrew with medical problems.
  • Course Review: The mission of the Naval Aviation Medical Examiner Course is to develop the knowledge, skill and self-confidence essential to provide optimal aeromedical support of fleet aviation units in remote environments with scarce medical resources. Students shall further develop their skills in clinical medicine, with emphasis on cardiology, neuropsychiatry, optometry/ophthalmology and otolaryngology. As aerospace medicine is primarily preventive, students shall also develop their skills in occupational and environmental medicine, and aviation safety.
    The course consists of the academic phase of the Naval Flight Surgeon curricula. It is subdivided into administrative, environmental physiology, operational medicine, and clinical medicine units.
  • Length: 61 days
  • Classes/yr: 03
  • Seats/yr: 12
  • CIN#: B-6A-2103
  • CDP: 08R3
  • Location: Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, FL
  • CME/CEU: 180
  • American Council on Education (ACE) Credit Recommendation: In the upper-division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in community and behavioral medicine, 3 in flight physiology, 3 in aviation safety, and 4 in aerospace medicine.
  • Accreditation Statement: The Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC), Continuing Medical Education (CME) Department, Bethesda, Maryland is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for Physicians. 

    The Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC) designates this live educational activity for a maximum of (180) AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Disclosure Statement: As a sponsor accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), it is the policy of the Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC) to require the disclosure of the existence of any significant financial interest or any other relationships a faculty member or a sponsor has with the manufacturer(s) or any commercial product(s) discussed in an educational presentation, and also to disclose discussions of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation(s). NMPDC has established policies in place that will identify and resolve all conflicts of interest prior to this educational activity. Detailed disclosure will be made on the date(s) of the activity.
  • Dates: The dates are subject to change without notice. See Flight Schedule for class schedule. All AMEs begin training with the Flight Surgeon class at ACADEMICS II section of the training schedule.
    *Report no later than 7 days prior to ACADEMICS II start date.
  • For more information about NAMI and the training we offer click HERE

Aerospace Medicine Flight Surgeon Refresher Course

  • Target Audience: Commissioned U.S. Navy Medical Corps officers previously designated as Naval Flight Surgeons whose clinical currency and privileges as a practicing flight surgeon have lapsed.
  • Prerequisites: COURSE 6A-2100, FLIGHT SURGEON. Candidates must be physically qualified for DIFOPS and aeronautically adaptable.  All aviation physical exams must be submitted to NMOTC (Code 42) for endorsement prior to acceptance. Candidates must meet DON operational medicine and primary care medicine core and supplemental privileges prior to reporting for training. Candidates must have current certification in BLS, ACLS, ATLS and ABLS prior to reporting for training. SKILL NOBC-0110.
  • Purpose: To update knowledge and skills for flight surgeons returning to operational flight surgeon billets after varying periods of absence.
  • Course Overview: Enable the reintegration of previously trained flight surgeons into operational flight surgeon billets. Instruction represents a compromise between minimum requirements and comprehensive updates. Course include aviation physical exams, interpretation of skull and spine x-rays, aviation psychiatry, aviation internal medicine, aviation neurology, aviation otolaryngology, aviation ophthalmology, aviation mishaps and flight performance problems, and occupational health.

    The curriculum is two weeks long and includes rotations in the NAMI internal medicine, neurology, psychiatry, otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology and physical examination clinics and the aviation physical standards department.  (Aviation water survival and physiology training are not an integral part of this course; however this training may be added to follow the Flight Surgeon Refresher Course.)
  • Length: 12 days
  • Classes/yr: 24
  • Seats/yr: 48
  • CIN#: B-6A-2102
  • CDP: 742A
  • Location: Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, FL
  • CME/CEU: 0
  • American Council on Education (ACE) Credit Recommendation: N/A
  • Dates: The dates for this course are upon request only. Please contact NAMI Operations to schedule at (850) 452-4657 or Student Control (850) 452-2458 (DSN 922).
  • For more information about NAMI and the training we offer click HERE

Aerospace Medicine Technician Course

  • Target Audience: PAYGRADE E3-E5, RATE HM
  • Prerequisites: See CANTRAC for full details.
  • Purpose: To train in the basic knowledge and skills to administratively assist Naval Flight Surgeons and support their role as aircraft mishap investigator.
  • Course Overview: The Aerospace Medicine Technician "C" school (NEC-8406) is a ten-week course to train hospital corpsmen as flight surgeon assistants. This course is designed to teach hospital Corpsmen the theory and practice of aviation medicine. The course includes advanced anatomy and physiology of the ear, nose, throat, sinuses, eye, and circulatory and respiratory systems; administrative and clerical procedures relative to aviation medicine; instructor training for fleet in-service programs; and aeromedical aspects of the flight environment.
  • Length: 10 weeks
  • Classes/yr: 4
  • Seats/yr: 144
  • CIN#: B-300-0017
  • CDP: 3301
  • Location: Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, FL
  • SKILL AWARDS: NEC 8406 Aerospace Medical Technician
  • American Council on Education (ACE) Credit Recommendation: In the lower-division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in public speaking, 3 in health and wellness, 3 in basic audiology, and 3 in physical assessment. In the upper-division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in flight physiology.
  • Dates: The dates are subject to change without notice. See Flight Schedule for class schedule.
  • For more information about NAMI and the training we offer click HERE

Undersea Medical Officer Course (UMOC)

NUMIOverview Video
  • Phase One: Six weeks at the Naval Undersea Medical Institute (NUMI) located on Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut. Training during this introductory phase includes rigorous physical conditioning and a modified Submarine Officer's Basic course including training in Damage Control, Fire Fighting, and Submarine systems. Students will also receive lectures on the operational aspects of medicine, psychiatry, and dentistry. Physical Training is emphasized during this phase to prepare the student for dive school, and entails approximately two-three hours of swimming, running, calisthenics, finning, and water confidence training per day. The goal of the physical training is for the student to pass the diver Physical Readiness Test (PRT) and to prepare the student for Dive Medical Officer (DMO) training conducted at the Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center (NDSTC). Students must be able to pass the Diver PRT by the end of Phase One in order to continue on to Phase Two at NDSTC.

  • Phase Two: Nine weeks of diving training at the Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center (NDSTC) in Panama City, Florida. An emphasis on physical conditioning is continued with daily PT conducted by the dive school training team. Each candidate will be required to pass a Diver PRT at NDSTC prior to the initiation of training. The first two weeks incorporate basic and advanced SCUBA diving. The candidate will receive additional training in the closed circuit re-breathing systems use by the navy SEAL teams (oxygen based) and EOD Teams (mixed gas based). Training in the salvage communities' surface supplied (hard hat) diving equipment is also provided during this phase. Students receive hands-on experience in hyperbaric chamber operations as well as extensive training in the Navy Recompression tables and diving medicine.

  • Phase Three: Begins after the successful completion of dive school and lasts for approximately eight weeks. Students will return to NUMI for additional training in Professional development, ACLS refresher training, and special topics in Naval Special Warfare Medicine, Tropical Medicine, and Clinical Hyperbaric Medicine. During phase three, UMOCs will receive extensive training in Radiation Health and health record administration. In addition, students are required to take and pass a comprehensive oral board encompassing all material presented in the course during all three phases of training.

    For more information, contact our Undersea Medical Officer Program Manager by email at NOMI-NUMIUMOC@med.navy.mil or call (860)694-2876 x 101.

  • UMOC Prerequisites:
    1. Be a citizen of the United States.
    2. Pass all three parts of national boards (USMLE or COMLEX) before reporting to NUMI.
    3. Successfully completed medical or osteopathic degree plus at least one year of medical internship at an accredited medical training facility.
    4. Hold a state medical license or have applied for a state medical license.
    5. Hold Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) certification. Certification must remain valid throughout this course.
    6. Be able to meet minimum physical requirements per MILPERSMAN 1200-100
    7. Students must have a security clearance SECRET to attend the Undersea Medical Officer course.
    8. Have a full uniform sea bag to include: Service Dress Blue, Service Dress White ("choker whites" for men), Summer White, Khaki, NWU and appropriate outerwear. Physical training uniforms consist of short-sleeved white t-shirts, UDT shorts (issued by NUMI or bought at a local uniform store), navy PT shorts, navy blue sweatshirt and sweatpants.
    9. Be currently Dive Duty and Submarine Duty qualified. This requires a current, complete physical exam specifically designated for the purpose of Dive Duty and Submarine Duty (MANMED 15-102 & 106). Applicants will also need to meet the MANMED Section 3 Standards for Enlistment and Commissioning. Any disqualifying condition will require a waiver, even if one has previously been received for the same condition. The Submarine and Diving Duty physical examination must be properly documented on a form DD 2807-1 and form DD 2808 and signed by an Undersea Medical Officer.
    10. Pressure test (to pressure of 60 fsw for 10 minutes in a dry hyperbaric chamber (this may be completed at NUMI if facilities are not available prior to detachment from previous command). Pressure test date & results must be documented on a form NAVMED 6150/2, which must be complete on both sides and signed as either PQ or NPQ for Diving Duty by a UMO or DMO.
    11. NAVMED 6150/2
    12. Physical requirements restrict pregnant service members from eligibility per OPNAVINST 6000.1 series
    13. For more info contact NUMI UMOC HERE

  • Navy Divers Physical Requirements
  • Students preparing for Undersea Medicine training should begin an active DAILY workout program with emphasis placed on building upper body strength and endurance. Swimming should be included in the training program with emphasis on breaststroke, sidestroke, and finning. A typical daily Physical Training (PT) regimen for Undersea Medical Officer Candidates (UMOCs) includes 100 push-ups, 40-60 pull-ups, 100 flutter-kicks, abdominal crunches, squats, shoulder exercises, and a one-to three-mile run.

    Students are encouraged to purchase a pair of fins (two recommended models are the Scuba Pro Jet Fins or Rocket Fins) and practice finning 1000 yards within 21 minutes, wearing mask & snorkel, prior to reporting to NUMI. Do yourself a favor and buy a good pair of running shoes to help reduce foot, ankle, and leg injuries! One pair of good running shoes is required; two pairs are recommended.

    The physical standards that MUST be met before a student will be allowed to attend the diving phase of training are as follows (per MILPERSMAN 1220-410 and MILPERSMAN 1220-100):

    Required Exercise Number Time
    SWIM: In a short-sleeved white t-shirts and UDT shorts, swim nonstop 500 yards utilizing the side-stroke or the breaststroke. Both strokes must be conducted without an overhand recovery (i.e., the swimmer's hand must remain below the surface of the water). Swimmers may push off from sides with the hands and feet after each pool length - 12:30 MIN
    Ten-minute rest period. - -
    PUSH-UPS: The exercise will be performed with the back straight, head up, and knees together. Begin by bending the elbow and lowering entire body as a single unit by bending the elbows until the arms form right angles and the upper arms are parallel to the deck. They will then push their body up and return to starting position by extending the elbows, raising the body as a single unit until the arms are straight. They will count each repetition aloud as they complete a push-up. 50 2 MIN
    Two-minute rest period. - -
    SIT-UPS: Lie flat on back with knees bent, heels close to buttocks (approximately 10 inches) with arms folded across the chest and feet held to the floor by partner. Sit up touching elbow to thighs no more than 3 inches below the knees while the hands remain in contact with the shoulders or chest. Each time you touch your thighs will count as one sit-up. Lie back touching shoulder blades to deck. Repeat as many times as required in the allotted time frame. You may stop and rest in the up or down position, however, if you lower your legs, fail to keep your feet to the ground, or fail to keep your arms folded across your chest, the test is ended. 50 2 MIN
    Two-minute rest period. - -
    PULL-UPS: The exercise will be performed by grasping the pull-up bar and hanging straight down. Hands should be placed on the bar with palms away, at shoulder width. Repetitions will be counted aloud by applicants each time they pull their chins over the bar. Applicants shall not swing or bicycle their feet. Applicants shall not use lateral, forward, or backward "kipping" motion while performing a pull-up.  6 N/A
    Ten minute rest period. - -
    RUN 1.5 MILES: Applicants must wear running shoes, t-shirt, and UDT shorts. 12 MIN 30 SEC

  • CIN#: B-6-A-2200
  • Location: Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut
  • CME/CEU:123
  • Accreditation Statement:The Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC), Continuing Medical Education (CME) Department, Bethesda, Maryland is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for Physicians. NMPDC designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 123 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
  • Disclosure Statement: The Activity Director, Dr. Christopher Cosentino, and all others involved in the planning, development and presentation of this CME activity provide the following disclosure information: Nothing to disclose.
  • Dates: The dates are subject to change without notice. See UMOC Schedule for class schedule. 
    *Report no later than 7 days prior to course start date.
  • For more information about NUMI and the training we offer click HERE

Submarine IDC

NUMIOverview Video

    A submariner realizes the extent the boat depends upon him as an individual. To a non-submariner, this is not evident and sometimes difficult to comprehend. A submarine at sea is a different world unto itself, and in consideration of the current Sea Warrior 21 initiatives and current global war on terror, the Navy must place responsibility and trust in the hands of those who take these boats to sea.

    In each submarine there are men who, in the hour of emergency or peril, turn to one another. These men are ultimately responsible to themselves and each to the other for all aspects of the operation of their submarine. They are the crew. They are the boat.

    The purpose of training IDC students is to equip them with the medical and administrative knowledge and skills required to administer all aspects of the medical department aboard an operational submarine. This is perhaps the most difficult and demanding assignment in the Navy. There is not an instance during the IDC’s tour that he can escape the grasp of responsibility.

    Are you willing to work hard? Are you up to the challenge of true independence? Are you looking for one of the most rewarding and challenging opportunities of your life? If so, contact your command career counsellor or e-mail us today.

    Submarine IDC Prerequisites

    Prerequisites are:

    • US Citizenship
    • E5-E8 Hospital Corpsman.
    • 6 years time in service, 4 years time in rate as HM
    • Male, not more than 30 years of age (age waivers accepted)
    • Physically qualified for Submarine Duty (per MANMED).
    • Secret clearance.
    • Completion of required NKO courses applicable to this course of instruction (see CANTRAC).

    Training is conducted onboard the Naval Submarine Base in Groton , Connecticut . The course of instruction is 52 weeks in length and begins after completing 6 weeks of Basic Enlisted Submarine School (BESS) at the Submarine Learning Center on the submarine base.

    Upon successful course completion, the new graduate is eligible for meritorious advancement to E6 (GPA of 91 or greater required), a selective reenlistment bonus (SRB) per current directives, and assignment to an independent duty billet onboard an operational submarine.

    Special pays includes submarine duty pay (begins the first day of BESS), special duty assignment pay (currently $375.00 monthly while on independent duty), sea pay, and continued submarine pay (CONSUB) when returning to shore duty (with incurred PRD OBLISERV).

    For additional information and requirements, visit the Catalog of Navy Training Courses (CANTRAC).

    Submarine IDC Schedules

  • For SUB IDC schedule visit the CANTRAC
  • For SUB IDC Refresher Training schedule visit the CANTRAC
  • SUB IDC Conversion schedule visit the CANTRAC
  • For more information about NUMI and the training we offer click HERE

Radiation Health

    The Radiation Health Department of NUMI is responsible for the initial radiation health training of Undersea Medical Officer Candidates (UMOC), Radiation Health Officers (RHO), Submarine Force Independent Duty Corpsman (IDC) and Radiation Health Technicians (RHT) in the United States Navy. NUMI is also the home of the Navy's only Radiation Health Indoctrination (RHI) program. To find out more about these courses, click on the Course Catalog to the left.

    Undersea Medical Officer (UMO)

    UMOs receive an introduction to Radiological Fundamentals and Radiological Controls followed by extensive training on Radiation Medical Examinations and Radiation Health Program Administration. At the end of the Radiation Health Phase of training, students are required to pass a comprehensive final examination followed by an oral board.

    Radiation Health Officer (RHO)

    RHOs receive the initial training necessary to manage Navy Radiation Health Programs in support of Naval Nuclear Propulsion, Nuclear Weapons, Medical/Dental, and Industrial Radiological Controls Programs. Instruction is provided in Radiological Fundamentals, Radiological Controls, Personnel Dosimetry, Medical Surveillance, Medical Casualty Response, Radiation Health Administration, Computer Science, and Radiation Safety in Naval Medical Facilities. At the end of a 5 week session, RHO students are required to pass a comprehensive final examination followed by an oral board.

      Prerequisites for RHO training:

    • Mediacally qualified
    • Current security clearance: SECRET
    • Deployable worldwide upon graduation

    Radiation Health Technician (RHT)

    RHTs receive the initial training necessary to provide technical assistance for the management of Navy Radiation Health Programs in support of Naval Nuclear Propulsion, Nuclear Weapons, Medical/Dental, and Industrial Radiological Controls Programs. Instruction is provided in Radiological Fundamentals, Radiological Controls, Personnel Dosimetry, Medical Surveillance, Medical Casualty Response, Radiation Health Administration, Computer Science, and Radiation Safety in Naval Medical Facilities. RHT students are required to pass a comprehensive final examination at the end of 9 weeks of training.

      Prerequisites for RHT training:

    • Mediacally qualified
    • Current security clearance: SECRET
    • Deployable worldwide upon graduation

    Independent Duty Corpsman (IDC)

    Submarine Force IDCs receive the training necessary to manage a Radiation Health Program aboard a nuclear powered submarine. Instruction is provided in Radiological Fundamentals, Radiological Controls, Personnel Dosimetry, Medical Surveillance, Casualty Response, Radiation Health Administration, Computer Science, Mathematics, Personnel Training, and Radiation Safety at Naval Medical Facilities. At the end of 9 weeks of didactic and laboratory training, students are required to pass a final comprehensive examination. Students then begin a radiation health mentorship program, concurrent with medicine training, which simulates an operational radiation health program that is evaluated by an ORSE during the final evaluation phase.

      Prerequisites for IDC radiation health phase of training

    • Current security clearance: SECRET

    Radiation Health Indoctrination (RHI)

    The Radiation Health Indoctrination course is a one week class that provides basic instruction in Radiation Health essential for support of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. It is designated for Medical Department personnel, military and civilian, assigned to nuclear powered ships, nuclear weapons capable ships, or selected maintenance facilities.

      Prerequisite for RHI training

    • U.S. Citizen

    For more information about NUMI and the training we offer click HERE

Expeditionary Medical Unit Training

    Pre deployment training for members deploying as an Individual Augmentee (IA) to Role III and Role II assignments in Afghanistan. The curriculum is based on USCENTCOM AOR A-11 and BUMED requirements for personnel deploying in support of Overseas Contingency Operations and meets the pre-deployment trauma training standards set by the DMRTi Combat Trauma Surgery Committee. Attendance is coordinated with US Fleet Forces Command and Expeditionary Combat Readiness Command and is an I-Stop in deployment orders.

    Pre-deployment training requirements to include BLS, ACLS, PALS, ATLS, TNCC, TCCC, EWSC, CESC, and TBI must be completed prior to departure from parent commands. Training requirements are determined by Corps and Specialty and are outlined in BUMEDINST 1500.15 and the BUMED Memorandum Pre-Deployment Trauma Training for Deploying Navy Medical Department Personnel.

    Expeditionary Medical Unit Training includes the following topics:



    • JTTS
    • Clinical Practice Guidelines
    • Initial Triage & Assessment
    • Neuro Trauma
    • Ocular Trauma
    • Neck Injuries
    • Traumatic and Difficult Airway
    • Thoracic Trauma
    • Spinal Trauma
    • Abdominal/Pelvic Trauma
    • Perineal Trauma
    • Orthopedic Trauma
    • Traumatic Amputations and Wound Management
    • Damage Control Resuscitation and Blood Products
    • Pediatric Trauma
    • Patient Handling
    • Disposition of Human Remains
    • Medical Ethics
    • Battlefield Afghanistan and Current Injury Patterns
    • Psychosocial Aspects
    • Wounded Warrior Panel Discussion
    • Mild TBI
    • TMIP

    For more information about NEMTI and the training we offer click HERE

Facility (EMF) Tiered Readiness Training

    Phase 1: Initial EMF Indoctrination and Orientation which will be completed at parents commands.

    Topics include:

    • Expeditionary Medical Facility Orientation
    • Mission and Capabilities

    Phase 2: Annual sustainment training that includes the assembly and disassembly of the EMF as well as medical, administrative and tactical topics required to meet EMF program requirements.

    Topics include:



    • Expeditionary Medical Facility Orientation
    • Mission and Capabilities
    • Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence
    • Administrative Functions
    • EMF Assembly
    • Public Works and Advance Base Camp Functions
    • Field Compound Sanitation
    • Radio Communications
    • Security Operations
    • Patient Administration
    • Combat Medical Operations
    • Triage and Patient Flow
    • Patient Handling
    • Medical Evacuation Functions
    • Aero Medical Evacuation
    • Law of Armed Conflict

    Phase 3: Theater-specific "Just in Time" training currently in development for personnel preparing to deploy with an EMF. CENTCOM AO, BUMED and deployment specific topics will be presented.

    Topics that can be presented include:



    • M9 Pistol Qualification: Includes live fire range and simulator
    • Improvised Explosion Device (IED) Recognition
    • Convoy Operations
    • Unexploded Ordinance Brief
    • Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC)/Mission-Oriented Protective Posture
      (MOPP), and Confidence Chamber
    • Land Navigation
    • Expeditionary Medical Facilities (EMF) Systems and Build
    • Basic Radio Communications
    • TCCC/First Aid
    • Patient Handling
    • Echelons of Care
    • Theater Medical Information Program (TMIP)
    • Cultural Awareness
    • Operational STRESS
    • Code of Conduct
    • Law of Armed Conflict
    • Rules of Engagement
    • Ethics/Detainee Handling
    • Disposition of Human Remains
    • ISOPREP/Personnel recovery
    • Sexual Assault Victim Intervention (SAVI)
    • Non-Lethal Weapons
    • Naval Operational Medical Lessons Learned Brief
    • M4 Carbine Familiarization
    • Troop Leading procedures
    • Basic Tactical training/individual movement
    • HMMMWV Egress Trainer

    For more information about NEMTI and the training we offer click HERE

Tactical Combat Casualty Care – Provider Course

Tactical Combat Casualty Care – Instructor Course

    (CIN: B-300-4000)

    Target Audience: Instructor candidates in pay grades E-5 and above with consideration for E-4 candidates with a letter of recommendation from their commanding officer documenting significant operational or instructor experience. Previous experience in a combat environment is a plus and recommended, but not necessary with commanding officer’s endorsement. Highly recommended students have Navy Instructor Navy Enlisted Classification 9502 or recent instructional experience.

    Purpose: The Tactical Combat Casualty Care – Instructor Course prepares BSO-18 personnel to conduct the Tactical Combat Casualty Care – Provider Course.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of an approved Tactical Combat Casualty Care - Provider Course within last 3 years and provide a certificate of completion.

    Funding: Parent command.

    Quota Control:Contact NEMTI DSN: 365-7121 ext. 222/220 or COM: 760-725-7121 ext. 222/220 or email:Usn.pendleton.navmedotcnemtica.list.tcccqc@mail.mil
    Send completed applications to the above e-mail. Download Application

    Class Size:10 minimum / 24 optimum / 30 maximum

    Course Length:5 days

    Lodging, Directions, etc: See TCCC Welcome Aboard Packet

    Course Material

    Course Schedule:
    Students are to report to NEMTI NLT 0800.



    Course Report Course Start Course End
    16 November 2015 16 November 2015 20 November 2015
    21 March 2016 21 March 2016 25 March 2016
    9 May 2016 9 May 2016 13 May 2016
    1 August 2016 1 August 2016 5 August 2016

    NOTE: CANCELLATION OF THE COURSE WILL OCCUR 5 DAYS PRIOR IF COURSE MINIMUM IS NOT MET.

    For more information about NEMTI and the training we offer click HERE

Navy Trauma Training Center (NTTC)

NTTC Overview Video

    Purpose

    The Los Angeles County + University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center provides an ideal trauma training environment with over 25,000 trauma evaluations and over 6,000 trauma admissions annually. LAC+USC is a 650-bed Level-1 Trauma Center, located just east of downtown Los Angeles. The medical staff at LAC+USC is comprised of world-renowned teaching faculty as part of the Keck School of Medicine. NTTC is committed to providing didactic and clinical trauma exposure that enhances personal and team knowledge and skills. The course is designed to afford rotators the opportunity to work alongside LAC+USC and NTTC staff as teams caring for critically ill and injured patients. The 21-day training schedule includes clinical shifts, formal didactics, case discussions, simulator training, and fresh tissue dissection labs.

    Important Information. Please Read First.

    If you are interested in enrolling in an upcoming NTTC course or have additional questions, please contact us at usn.pensacola.navmedoptractrpns.list.nttc-courses.

    Apply online for a NTTC course.

    NOTE: A Special Request Chit (see link below) approved by your Directorate level (or equivalent) at a minimum must be obtained prior to submitting an application for a particular course number. In addition, Nurse Corps applicants must also have the Special Request Chit signed by their DNS. If you are assigned to a USMC unit, your Special Request Chit must be signed by your leave approval authority (no LPO, LCPO, etc.) Each course number must have a separate approved Special Request chit. The approved Special Request chit must be faxed to 323-226-4113 or scanned and sent via email to usn.pensacola.navmedoptractrpns.list.nttc-courses at the time you apply online. Applications received at NTTC without a signed Special Request Chit verifying deployment dates and platform will not be considered.

    NAVPERS 1336-3 SPECIAL REQUEST CHIT

    NTTC SELECTION MEMO

    Course Schedule FY16 & FY17

    Course Number Application Cut Off Date NTTC Selection Due to NMOTC Course Report Date Course Start Date
    Course End Date
    Timeline (# of Days) 60 50 14 1 0 20
    16010 06-Aug-15 16-Aug-15 21-Sep-15 05-Oct-15 06-Oct-15 26-Oct-15
    16020 03-Sept-15 13-Sep-15 19-Oct-15 02-Nov-15 03-Nov-15 23-Nov-15
    16030
    05-Nov-15
    15-Nov-15
    21-Dec-15
    04-Jan-16
    05-Jan-16 25-Jan-16
    16040
    03-Dec-15 13-Dec-15 18-Jan-16
    01-Feb-16
    02-Feb-16 22-Feb-16
    16050 
    31-Dec-15 10-Jan-16 15-Feb-16
    29-Feb-16
    01-Mar-16 21-Mar-16
    16060
    03-Feb-16 13-Feb-16 20-Mar-16
    03-Apr-16
    04-Apr-16 24-Apr-16
     16070
    02-Mar-16 12-Mar-16 17-Apr-16
    01-May-16 
    02-May-16 22-May-16
     16080
    06-Apr-16 16-Apr-16 22-May-16
    05-Jun-16
    06-Jun-16 26-Jun-16
    16090 11-May-16 21-May-16 26-Jun-16 10-Jul-16 11-Jul-16 31-Jul-16
    16100 08-Jun-16 18-Jun-16 24-Jul-16 07-Aug-15 08-Aug-16 28-Aug-16
    16110 06-Jul-16 16-Jul-16 21-Aug-16 04-Sep-16 05-Sep-16 25-Sep-16
    17010 03-Aug-16 13-Aug-16 18-Sep-16 02-Oct-16 03-Oct-16 23-Oct-16
    17020 31-Aug-16 10-Sep-16
    16-Oct-16
    30-Oct-16 31-Oct-16 20-Nov-16
    17030​ ​09-Nov-16 19-Nov-16 25-Dec-16​ 08-Jan-17​ 09-Jan-17 ​29-Jan-17
    17040 07-Dec-16 17-Dec-16 22-Jan-17 05-Feb-17 06-Feb-17 26-Feb-17
    17050 04-Jan-17 14-Jan-17 19-Feb-17 05-Mar-17 06-Mar-17 26-Mar-17
    17060 01-Feb-17 11-Feb-17 19-Mar-17 02-Apr-17 03-Apr-17 23-Apr-17
    17070 01-Mar-17 11-Mar-17 16-Apr-17 30-Apr-17 01-May-17 21-May-17
    17080
    05-Apr-17 15-Apr-17 21-May-17 04-Jun-17 05-Jun17 25-Jun-17
    ​17090 10-May-17​ 20-May-17​ 25-Jun-17​ ​09-Jul-17 10-Jul-17​ 30-Jul-17
    ​17100 07-Jun-17​ 17-Jun-17​ 23-Jul-17​ 06-Aug-17 07-Aug-17​ 27-Aug-17​
    ​17110 ​05-Jul-17 15-Jul-17​ 20-Aug-17 03-Sep-17​ 04-Sep-17​ 24-Sep-17​

     

    NOTE: NTTC will accept applications past the Application Cut Off Date in the event personnel drop out of the class and seats become open.

    NOTE: NMOTC will be contacting your Command's credentialing department to acquire your ICTB if selected for training. Please contact your credentialing office once you have applied to NTTC to ensure your credentials are up to date and in order.

    For more information about NEMTI and the training we offer click HERE

Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP)

    The Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP) consists of two major elements:

    AVIATION PHYSIOLOGY TRAINING: The purpose of this training is to familiarize designated and prospective flight crews with the physiological hazards associated with flight.

    AVIATION WATER SURVIVAL TRAINING: The purpose of this training is to familiarize and develop confidence in designated and prospective flight crews with techniques and procedures proven successful in sea survival following ditching or bailout over water.

    Curriculum Subject Matter Topics

    • Aviation Physiology
    • Human Factors
    • Oxygen Equipment
    • Low Pressure Chamber
    • Sensory Physiology
    • Night Vision
    • Survival First Aid
    • Aviation Life Support Equipment
    • Egress
    • Ejection Seats
    • Water Survival
    • Survival Swim Strokes
    • Rescue Procedures
    • Parachute Descent
    • Supplemental Emergency Breathing Device (SEBD)
    • Extended Sea Survival
    • Underwater Egress

    The Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP) includes four general categories of survival training courses.

    1. Aircrew Indoctrination NASTP Training.
    2. Aircrew Refresher NASTP Training.
    3. Non-aircrew NASTP Training.
    4. Non-aircraft Specific NASTP Training.

    Generally for all training categories listed above, course completion letters will indicate which qualification was received and for which specific aircraft the qualification is valid.

    Physical Prerequisites for Participation in the NASTP

    1. All prospective and designated flight personnel (including DoD civilians) on competent flight orders shall have and present a current BUMED 6410/2 prior to participation in any NASTP dynamic training. The documentation shall be signed by a naval FS, or aviation medical officer (AMO).
    2. Fleet Marine Force (FMF) Medical Officers, Diving Medical Officers (DMO) and Undersea Medical Officers (UMO) are authorized to provide medical clearance letters for personnel participating in basic/advanced water survival/underwater egress training (i.e., SEBD, Survival Swimming, Remedial Swim, Non-aircrew Underwater Emergency Egress, CBR In-water Egress & Survival, USMC Underwater Egress Familiarization).
    3. DMOs and UMOs are authorized to provide medical clearance letters for military personnel (e.g., Special Operations Forces (SOF)) participating in High Altitude Parachutist (HAP) Physiology or Advanced Underwater Egress Training and Survival Procedures.
    4. Enlisted Personnel (e.g., Independent Duty Corpsman (IDC) or other Hospital Corpsman (HM)) are not authorized to provide (or sign) medical clearance for FMF or other personnel with the following exception: IDC or HM may issue an aeromedical clearance after consultation with a credentialed flight surgeon or aeromedical provider. The record must include specific identifying information of the provider consulted as well as summarize the information discussed.
    5. Personnel participating in NASTP lectures only do not require medical clearance.
    6. Civilian contractors (pilots, aircrew, and non-aircrew) shall present a current FAA Medical Certificate and OPNAV 3710/18a form signed by a FAA Certified Aviation Medical Examiner or other qualified physician prior to participation in high-risk, dynamic NASTP training. If a current FAA Medical Certificate plus a completed 3710/18a is not utilized for participation in high-risk, dynamic NASTP training, the civilian contractor shall present a completed OPNAV 3710/18 form prior to participation in the training. Military flight surgeons shall have no responsibility for the endorsement of NASTP training (3710/18a) for civilian contractors.
    7. With regard to naval aviator and enlisted aircrew candidates entering initial training through either the CNATRA or USAF AETC pipeline, exceptions to paragraph 8.4.3.a are authorized as determined by NAVOPMEDINST as follow:
    8. For cases where NAMI has a completed flight physical but cannot issue an Aeromedical Clearance Notice pending administrative processing, NAMI may certify the candidate physically qualified to commence Initial training using NAVOPMEDINST 6120/2.
    9. Naval aviator candidates and enlisted aircrew candidates awaiting waiver approval for a physical defect may be transferred from NAVAVSCOLSCOM to further aviation pipeline training only upon recommendation from NAMI and NAVAVSCOLSCOM.
    10. Non-aircrew personnel, Federal Government agency personnel (except NASA) and civilian agency personnel shall have a BUMED 6410/2 or OPNAV 3710/18 for participation in the NASTP. The medical clearance is valid for 1 year. Where non-aircrew personnel may fly in U.S. Navy/U.S. Marine Corps aircraft on a recurring basis, their medical clearance should be adjusted to expire on the last day of their birth month.
    11. Appropriate medical clearances for other U.S. military, USCG or NASA personnel participating in the NASTP may be signed by those services’ or agencies’ medical officers, signifying that the individual is physically qualified for participation in high-risk NASTP training.
    12. Physical prerequisites for other personnel not identified above shall be determined on a case-by-case basis by COMNAVAIRFOR (N45) or CMC (ASM).
    13. The NASTP swimming ability prerequisite is U.S. Navy 3rd Class swimmer, U.S. Marine Corps CWS-1, or better. For U.S. Marine Corps assault troops participating in NASTP Module M5, U.S. Marine Corps CWS-3 (to include survival flotation instruction) or better is required. Officer and enlisted aircrew receiving pre-flight training at Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC) shall pass the intermediate swim course (CIN C-050-0605)and CPR/Basic First Aid prior to enrolling in aircrew indoctrination NASTP training. Specific details of requirements to be followed are provided in the front matter of each CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved NASTP curriculum.

    Aircrew Indoctrination NASTP Training

    Required initial training for all prospective active-duty USN and USMC aeronautically designated personnel and for USAF and USCG personnel in the Navy pipeline. Training is aircraft specific. Unless otherwise specified, all unique modules/versions must be completed by CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula in order to qualify for a particular aircraft. In the situation of qualifying for multiple aircraft/classes of aircraft common identical modules do not need to be repeated. Aircraft/Class-specific requirements are detailed in the CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula. NASTP Training is valid for 4 years.

    1. Aircrew Indoctrination NASTP Training for Class 1 aircraft. (Previously documented as N1/NP1 and N6 or N5/NP2 and N6).
    2. Aircrew Indoctrination NASTP Training for Class 2 aircraft. (Previously documented as N1/NP1 and N11 or N5/NP2 and N11).
    3. Aircrew Indoctrination NASTP Training for Class 3 aircraft. (Previously documented as N1/NP1 and N12 or N5/NP2 and N12).
    4. Aircrew Indoctrination NASTP Training for Class 4 aircraft. (Previously documented as N1/NP1 and N11 or N5/NP2 and N11).

    Aircrew Refresher NASTP Training

    Required refresher training for all aeronautically designated personnel. Prerequisite is completion of one of the Aircrew Indoctrination NASTP Training courses. Training requirements per paragraph 8.4.1 apply for USAF, other U.S. Military and foreign military. Training is aircraft specific per CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula. Unless otherwise specified, all unique modules must be completed in accordance with CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula in order to qualify for a particular aircraft. In the situation of qualifying for multiple aircraft/classes of aircraft, common modules do not need to be repeated. NASTP Training is valid for 4 years. Aircraft/Class-specific requirements are detailed in the CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula.

    1. Aircrew Refresher NASTP Training for Class 1 aircraft. (Previously documented as R1/RP1).
    2. Aircrew Refresher NASTP Training for Class 2 aircraft. (Previously documented as R2/RP2).
    3. Aircrew Refresher NASTP Training for Class 3 aircraft. (Previously documented as R3/RP3).
    4. Aircrew Refresher NASTP Training for Class 4 aircraft. (Previously documented as R4/RP4).

    Non-aircrew NASTP Training

    Initial training for all non-aeronautically designated personnel who require aircraft-specific NASTP training prior to flight. Students include VIPs, Project Specialists, Selected Passengers, and Midshipmen. Training is aircraft specific in accordance with CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula. Unless otherwise specified in this instruction, all unique modules must be completed in accordance with the CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula in order to qualify for a particular aircraft. In the situation of qualifying for multiple aircraft/classes of aircraft, common modules do not need to be repeated. NASTP Training is valid for 4 years for Selected Passengers and Project Specialists, valid for 180 days for Midshipmen, and valid for 90 days for VIP and orientation flights. Aircraft/Class-specific requirements are detailed in the CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula. The specific aircraft qualification(s) shall be listed in the course completion letter. Upon expiration of the NASTP qualification, the course shall be repeated to retain/regain currency.

    1. Non-aircrew NASTP Training for Class 1 aircraft. (Previously documented as N3/NP3).
    2. Non-aircrew NASTP Training for Class 2 aircraft. (Previously documented as N4/NP4-Cat 2).
    3. Non-aircrew NASTP Training for Class 3 aircraft. (Previously documented as N4/NP4-Cat 3).
    4. Non-aircrew NASTP Training for Class 4 aircraft. (Previously documented as N4/NP4-Cat 4).

    Non-aircraft Specific NASTP Training

    Mission Specific required specialized, supplemental or continuation training for aircrew and non-aircrew personnel. Training elements required are specific in accordance with CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curricula. The specific qualification(s) completed shall be listed in the course completion letter. Upon expiration of the NASTP qualification, if applicable, the course shall be repeated to retain/regain currency.

    1. CFET (previously documented as NP-5). Centrifuge-based Flight Environment Training (CFET). Required initial training for all tactical jet aircrew flying AV-8, EA-6, F-5, F-16, F/A-18, or F-35 aircraft prior to reporting for FRS training (ideally CFET training should be completed prior to reporting for the advanced strike syllabus). Documented dynamic centrifuge training completed as a student at NADC Warminster, Holloman AFB, or Brooks AFB is recognized as meeting CFET requirements. Designated aircrews flying the above-listed aircraft who have not received dynamic CFET training (NP5) shall complete this course within 18 months of the signature date of this instruction unless they are specifically waived of the requirement by COMNAVAIRFOR (N45) or CMC (ASM). Failure to meet this NASTP requirement within the timeline stated shall result in grounding until successful participation is completed or CFET is waived. CFET is required only once during an aviation career, but can be repeated upon written request by the aviator’s parent command.
    2. HAP Physiology (Previously documented as NP6). High Altitude Parachutist (HAP) Physiology. Physiological training for military personnel (e.g., special operations forces (SOF)) conducting HAP operations.. The training is valid for 5 years and meets USAF/USA HAP Initial physiology training requirements. Upon expiration of qualification, this course is to be repeated in its entirety to maintain currency.
    3. Supplemental Emergency Breathing Device (SEBD) (previously documented as N8). Advanced underwater egress training for personnel authorized to use the SEBD, HABD, or similar underwater egress breathing devices. Prerequisites for training are per CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curriculum guidance. Training is valid for 4 years. More frequent training may be given when requested in writing by the student’s parent command.
    4. Survival Swimming (Previously documented as N8). Basic Aviation Water Survival Skills, Remedial and Adjunctive Training. Provides supplemental training in water survival skills and equipment usage and can be used for remediation in specific water survival training elements. Training available upon request or as required.
    5. Non-aircrew Underwater Emergency Egress (Previously documented as N9). Provides Underwater emergency egress training using training devices 9D5, 9D6, and/or other CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved underwater egress trainers for authorized personnel whose duty assignments necessitates frequent overwater helicopter or tilt rotor aircraft flights. Training is valid for 4 years. More frequent training may be provided when requested in writing by the student’s parent command.
    6. CBR Ensemble In-water Egress and Survival (Previously documented as N10). Advanced water survival training for aircrew using CBR ensembles. Prerequisite training is successful completion of Aircrew Indoctrination NASTP Training for Class 1, 2, 3, or 4 aircraft and/or as stated in the CNO/COMNAVAIRFOR approved curriculum. Training is valid for 4 years. More frequent training may be provided when requested in writing by the student’s parent command.
    7. USMC “Non-Aircrew” Personnel Underwater Egress Familiarization/Orientation Course (previously documented as N13). This course is authorized only for USMC non-aircrew personnel. The course is designed specifically to provide USMC Expeditionary Forces familiarization with underwater egress procedures from a multi-place underwater egress trainer. This course does not satisfy the module M prerequisite for Supplemental Emergency Breathing Device (SEBD) training, nor is it a substitute for Non-aircrew Underwater Emergency Egress course (listed above). Prerequisites are completion of CWS3 or higher and documentation of survival flotation training. This course is not valid for USN personnel performing FMF duties: these personnel must complete the Non-aircrew Underwater Emergency Egress course. No time limit is established for this course. Training may be provided whenever requested by the USMC student’s parent command.
    8. Advanced Underwater Egress Training (Previously documented as N14). This course provides advanced training in underwater emergency egress (from various platforms) that is specific to the equipment worn or carried by personnel. Course prerequisites are available from the ASTC or NSTI. No time limit is established for this course. Training may be provided whenever requested by the student’s parent command.
    9. Dynamic Hypoxia Training. This course is to provide didactic and dynamic training focusing on experiencing the symptoms of acute altitude-induced hypoxia and performing corrective actions via a low pressure chamber flight or Reduced Oxygen Breathing Device (ROBD). This course is intended to be used as supplemental or adjunctive aircrew training. If completed by designated aircrew within 90 days of attending Aircrew Refresher NASTP Training the dynamic hypoxia portion of the applicable curriculum does not need to be repeated (in this situation, the completion of the Dynamic Hypoxia Training course shall be used to calculate the ensuing Requalification intervals). No time limit is established for this course. Training may be provided whenever requested by the student or student’s command.

    Aircraft Classification

    Class 1 Ejection Seat

    • AV-8
    • EA-6
    • F/A-18
    • F-16
    • F-35
    • F-5
    • S-3
    • T-2
    • T-38
    • T-45
    • T-6

    Class 2 Non-Ejection Seat, Parachute Equipped

    • E-2
    • C-130
    • P-3
    • T-34
    • C-2

    Class 3 Helicopters

    • AH-1
    • H-3
    • H-46
    • H-53
    • H-60
    • TH-57
    • UH-1

    Class 4 Pressurized (or Oxygen Available/Required), Non-Parachute Equipped

    • C-12
    • C-20
    • C-21
    • C-26
    • C-35
    • C-37
    • C-40
    • C-9
    • E-4
    • T-1
    • T-39
    • T-44
    • V-22

    Note: Aircraft not listed above shall be categorized and trained based on which class is most applicable.

    For more information about NSTI and the training we offer click HERE

Aeromedical Adjunctive Training

    Level A - Required Annual Training

    1. Aeromedical aspects of ejection and/or emergency ground egress (as applicable). NVD removal training shall be incorporated into initial and annual training for aviators, aircrew and project specialists flying with NVDs in ejection seat aircraft.
    2. Sensory problems — Spatial disorientation/misorientation, visual illusions, visual scanning, situational awareness (including low level flight issues) and disorientation countermeasures (may be fulfilled during instrument ground school training and should be conducted by an aerospace physiologist, FS or aerospace physiology technician).
    3. Laser/LEP.
    4. Hypoxia Awareness Training (Class 1 Aircraft only) — Platform specific hypoxia awareness training to include signs, symptoms, types of hypoxia, and the situations which might cause them (training may be accomplished as lecture only or as part of NASTP Dynamic Hypoxia Awareness Training (uses a ROBD).
    5. G-Tolerance Improvement Procedures (GTIP) — For tactical aircraft (TACAIR) pilots. This brief should cover anti-G straining maneuver (AGSM), push/pull, G-suit fit, hydration, nutrition, fatigue, and exercises that will promote increases in G tolerance.

    Level B - Recommended Annual Mission Training (as applicable for aviators and aircrew)

    1. Night vision/NVD (MAWTS-1 refresher curriculum).
    2. CBRND.
    3. Hypoxia awareness training (may include ROBD) for tilt-rotor and all fixed wing platforms less class 1.
    4. Aircraft-installed pane-mounted first aid kit (as applicable).

    Level C - Recommended Deployment Work-up Training

    1. Circadian rhythms/long duration flights/fatigue.
    2. Sustained operations/combat stress.
    3. Survival/combat first aid - Self aid/buddy aid review to include aircraft/survival vest/raft first aid kit contents and proper use.
    4. Land survival - Geographically specific emphasizing hypo/hyperthermia in jungle mountain, desert and arctic environments (cold/hot weather climate briefs as required).
    5. Water survival - Geographically specific emphasizing hypo/hyperthermia and use of cold weather gear if applicable.
    6. Military Laser threat briefs (available from MAWTS-1).
    7. Military communication devices and procedures (applicable survival radios, etc).

    Level D - Recommended Annual Safety Briefs

    1. Human performance enhancement (e.g., stress management, fatigue management, fitness for health, etc.).
    2. Situational awareness - Anomalies of attention/complacency, learning, memory improvement, temporal distortion.
    3. Fitness enhancement - Exercise/cardiovascular fitness/strength training, proper nutrition, and weight management.
    4. Nutrition, diet, and over-the-counter supplements.
    5. Simulator sickness/motion.
    6. Noise and vibration.
    7. Aircraft mounted first aid kit contents/use a long with survival vest/raft first aid kit contents and proper use.
    8. Aviation physiology (may include hypoxia awareness training) to include barometric physiological phenomena, decompression sickness, altitude threats.

    For more information about NSTI and the training we offer click HERE

Advanced Dental Assistant Program (ADAP)

    View the Curriculum

    ADAP Student Welcome Aboard

    The Advanced Dental Assistant Program (ADAP), formerly known as the Expanded Functions Dental Assistant (EFDA) program, was established in December of 2006 and convened the first class on April 25th, 2007.

    Upon successful completion of the program, the Corpsman will have improved dental knowledge and dental skills that can be used to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the dental team. After two years of clinical experience, the Advanced Dental Assistant can challenge the Dental Assistant National Board in three different certification areas. The course is an outstanding stepping stone to dental hygiene or dental school. Upon graduation, the Corpsman will be awarded the Navy Enlisted Classification of HM-8702 and assigned to one of various operational or shore platforms.

    ADAP provides advanced instruction that educates, trains, and prepares Hospital Corpsmen to serve in administrative, clinical, and/or auxiliary roles in support of Dental Officers within Navy Medicine. ADAP graduates serve in periodontics, prosthodontics, and operative dentistry departments, as well as leadership positions in clinical management and healthcare administration. The program is staffed by two general dentistry specialists, a dental hygienist, an advanced dental laboratory technician and two experienced Advanced Dental Assistant instructors. The 21-week program includes 840 hours of instruction. The 168 didactic hours, 312 lab/practical hours, and 360 clinical hours are divided into 5 teaching modules with 11 instructional units. Additionally, the American Council on Education recommends 17 college credits upon completion of the program.

    If you have been accepted to ADAP, congratulations and welcome aboard! Please see the “Welcome Aboard” link and contact any of the ADAP Staff at COMM (619) 532-6393 or DSN 522-6393. You will be assigned a Military Advisor to guide you through the process and assure you know what to expect when you report for school.

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Surface Force Independent Duty Corpsman

    INDEPENDENT DUTY CORPSMAN STUDENTS

    Congratulations on your orders to Independent Duty Corpsman (IDC) School. IDC School is designed for motivated E5 thru E-7 Hospital Corpsmen who seek great responsibility and become one of the most respected NEC’s in the Medical Enlisted Community as well as in the Navy. IDC’s are the “subject matter expert” for the Hospital Corpsman rating with the most diverse duty stations in the Navy from Surface Ships, Sea Bees, Special Warfare units such as the SEAL’s or Expeditionary Warfare and also billets with the Fleet Marine Force.

    SFIDC CANTRAC1

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    During this 12 month course, you will have a mix of classroom and clinical training. Emphasis is placed on learning Anatomy and Physiology; Physical Diagnosis;  Clinical Lab;  Pharmacy;  Chemical,  Biological, and Nuclear Medicine; Preventive Medicine;  Supply;  Food Service Sanitation; Substance Abuse; Medical Department Responsibilities; Medical Diagnosis and Treatment;  Pest Control;  Naval and Shipboard Organization;  Management of Medical/Surgical Emergency Dental Conditions; NAVOSH; ACLS; TCCC; Maintenance Material Management (3M); Dive Medicine;  certification as a Basic Life Support Instructor and registration for a National Provider Identification (NPI) number.  Completion of IDC School results in the student receiving Navy Enlisted Classification HM-8425/HM-8494.

    See “Welcome Aboard” to download a copy of the welcome aboard package that you will using during your transition.

    COMMAND ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBER

    SURFACE WARFARE MEDICINE INSTITUTE (SWMI)
    INDEPENDENT DUTY CORPSMAN SCHOOL
    34101 Farenholt Avenue Building 14
    San Diego California 92134-5291
    Office: (619)532-7968
    Fax: (619)532-8251

    COMMAND LOCATION

    SWMI is located in Building 14 on the Naval Medical Center San Diego compound.  A map with turn-by-turn directions is located on the SWMI website to help ease your travel from the airport.

    All students with orders to SWMI must report to the Administration Department located on the 2nd deck, room 213, Monday thru Friday 0700 to 1530.  After hours, check in at the Quarterdeck, 1st deck, room 106.  Building 14, Quarterdeck secures at 2000 during the work week and 1200 on Saturday. Sunday building is secured.  Holidays and after 2000, check in at NMCSD Quarterdeck, 1st deck, Building

    After hours/ weekend/ holiday check in:

    Check in at NMCSD Quarterdeck and ensure your ORDERS ARE STAMPED

    REQUIRED ADMIN ITEMS

    • ORIGINAL COPY OF ORDERS
    • PAGE 2
    • EVALS FROM LAST 5 YEARS
    • FAMILY CARE PLAN (IF APPLICABLE)
    • NAVY LODGE TRAVEL RECIEPTS (IF APPLICABLE)

    PH PHYSICAL CONDITIONING

    As with any Navy or Marine Corps command, physical training is a large and very important part of training and education.  Physical training preparation prior to reporting is extremely essential. A daily routine of running two to four miles, sit-ups, and push-ups should be adequate to prepare you. Over the 12 month course, IDC students will run an average of 12 miles per week and participate in the Navy PFA, group PT, and School house runs.  Body Fat percentage is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED to be less than 21% for males and 32% for females, upon check in.

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Surface Force Independent Duty Corpsman Refresher

    The Surface Force Independent Duty Corpsman (NEC 8425) Shipboard Refresher Training Course is to provide enroute refresher training to Independent Duty Corpsman who are rotating to sea duty or specified isolated duty stations independent of a medical officer after completion of shore duty. This course will introduce the student to shipboard medical/dental administration; patient care, AMAL/ADAL and inventories; shipboard sanitation and potable water testing; SNAP Automated Medical Systems, Women at Sea program, Pest management, Basic laboratory, and mental health evaluations.

    The course is open to HM E-5 through E-9 who are transferring to a ship or Sea duty.

    Location: This course is offered at Surface Warfare Medicine Institute, San Diego, CA.

    SCHEDULE: Offered every other month.

    SEATS: Maximum class size is 10 students.

    REGISTRATION: Most students will be ordered to attend enroute to a shipboard assignment.Others may be sent by Chain of Command (COC) after arrival aboard. To confirm a seat in the course the member or member’s COC should contact Quota Control or member’s Detailer. For registration assistance please contact SFIDC Refresher Training POC HMC Jason Juarez at (619) 532-6764 or Jason.Juarez@med.navy.mil.

    • SECURITY CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified
    • COURSE LENGTH: 15 Training days
    • CIN #: B-300-0033
    • CDP: 05E8
    • STU UIC: 41758

    CURRICULUM AUTHORITY: Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Reference BUMEDINST 1500.22

    QUOTA CONTROL: Surface Warfare Medicine Institute

    PRIMARY MODE OF INSTRUCTION: Group-paced; shipboard tours

    REQUIRED NKO COURSES: The below NKO courses are required to be completed prior to completion of SFIDC Refresher Training.

    HEAT STRESS AFLOAT: Course ID: NMETC-HAS-001

    HEARING CONSERVATION: Course ID: 14995

    HEALTH ASPECTS OF MARINE SANITATION DEVICES: Course ID: NMETC-HAMSD-1.0

    POTABLE WATER: WATER SANITATION AFLOAT: NMETC-WSA-010

    FOOD SAFETY AND FOOD SERVICE SANITATION (PART 1): Course ID: sco12_5142d9d6

    FOOD SAFETY AND FOOD SERVICE SANITATION (PART 2): Course ID: sco12_2880d9d6

    FOOD SAFETY AND FOOD SERVICE SANITATION (PART 3): Course ID: sco12_9ea3d9d3

    3-M MAINTENANCE PERSON BASIC/CORE: Course ID: CSS-3MBC-001

    3M BASICS: COURSE ID: CSS-Basic-001

    3M SAFETY: COURSE ID: CSS-Safety-001

    Below is the list of the courses and training the student will receive. If you have completed any of these courses within the one year prior to attending SFIDC Refresher Training, contact HMCS Meyers and notify him.

    1. CPR Instructor
    2. Food Safety and Pest Management Course at NEPMU (3 days)
    3. MILVAX
    4. SAMS Training
    5. Mental Health
    6. CSIB Refresher
    7. Shipboard Medical Training
    8. Laboratory Refresher
    9. OB/GYN and Dental Refresher
    10. OB/GYN and Dental Clinical Time
    11. Shipboard time with an IDC

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Surface Force Medical Indoctrination

    The Surface Warfare Medical Indoctrination course is designed to orient medical enlisted personnel in the duties and responsibilities of assignments to components of the Naval Surface Force. This course will introduce the student to shipboard medical/dental administration; triage, treatment and transportation of combat casualties; AMAL/ADAL and inventories; shipboard sanitation and potable water testing; Heat Stress and Hearing Conservation Programs; and the SNAP Automated Medical System (SAMS).

    The course is open to HM E-1 through E-8 without prior sea duty experience. This course is NOT intended for Independent Duty Corpsmen or personnel with prior sea duty.

    LOCATION: This course is offered at Surface Warfare Medicine Institute, San Diego, CA.

    SCHEDULE: Offered one week out of each month with the exception of December.

    SFMIC WEST - SAN DIEGO

    Class # FY16
    Convene
    Graduate
    16010
    11/16/2015
    11/20/2015
    16020
    2/22/2016
    2/26/2016
    16030
    4/25/2016
    4/29/2016
    16040
    6/20/2016
    6/24/2016
    16050
    7/25/2016
    7/29/2016
    16060
    9/26/2016
    9/30/2016

    SFMIC EAST - PORTSMOUTH

    Class # FY 16
    Convene
    Graduate
    16010
    10/5/2015
    10/9/2015
    16020
    1/11/2016
    1/15/2016
    16030
    2/29/2016
    3/4/2016
    16040
    5/2/2016
    5/6/2016
    16050
    8/1/2016
    8/5/2016
    16060
    9/12/2016
    9/16/2016

    SEATS: Maximum class size is 25 students

    REGISTRATION: Most students will be ordered to attend en-route to a shipboard assignment.  Others may be sent by Chain of Command (COC) after arrival aboard.  To confirm a seat in the course the member or member's COC should contact Quota Control or member's Detailer. For registration assistance please contact SFMIC POC HMC Eduardo Magpayo or HMC Benjamin Carrido at SWMI-BabyDocPOC@med.navy.mil or by phone at (619) 532-5109/5110.

    • SECURITY CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified
    • COURSE LENGTH: 5 training days
    • CIN #: B-300-1000
    • CDP: 05E7
    • STU UIC: 41758

    CURRICULUM AUTHORITY: Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Reference BUMEDINST 1500.22

    QUOTA CONTROL: Surface Warfare Medicine Institute

    PRIMARY MODE OF INSTRUCTION: Group-paced; shipboard tour(s)

     Click here for required NKO Courses that needs to be completed prior to class convening.

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Navy Drug and Alcohol Counselor School(NDACS)

    NDACS Training Application Procedures

    The Navy Drug and Alcohol Counselor School (NDACS) training application is designed to accommodate enlisted personnel (E-5 through E-9) interested in attending NDACS. Because NDACS is a rigorous competency based course, a thorough screening is a valuable tool in identifying eligible personnel. The application and screening assess personal strengths and possible deficiencies in the areas of physical and mental health, positive attitudes towards self and others, effective communication skills and the absence of any alcohol, other drug abuse, compulsive overeating or other emotional problems.

    All prospective NDACS students are required to be screened and have a favorable evaluation prior to admission. Screening evaluations will be conducted by certified Navy Drug and Alcohol Counselors (military or civilian) assigned to a Navy Treatment Facility.

    Additional information concerning NDACS application is available by contacting, NDACS, BUPERS (Pers 4010D1).

    Other applicants (Coast Guard, Army, and foreign military students) are required to submit a completed application package and be screened by a qualified counselor.

     Navy Drug and Alcohol Counselor Training Application (NAVPERS 5350/1 (Rev 11-92) contains detailed directions for completing and submitting the two part application package. Part I of the application can be downloaded via this website. Part II will be completed by a qualified SARP Counselor.  

    All application packages (whether recommending approval or not) shall be forwarded to :

    Officer in Charge
    SWMI NDACS, Bldg. 500
    140 Sylvester Road
    San Diego, CA 92106-3521

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Physician Assistant Program Phase II

    Overview

    The Interservice Physician Assistant Program is 29 months in length. Students attend Phase I of training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas and Phase II at San Diego, California.  Phase II of the program consists of 14 clinical rotations at Naval Medical Center, San Diego, and at civilian facilities in the San Diego area.  This portion of the training is responsible for the development and implementation of clinical training for Navy Physician Assistant students.  It is 13 months in length and includes clinical rotations and directed studies course.  Successful completion of Phase II culminates in the award of a Masters of Physician Assistant Studies (MPAS) degree from the affiliated university.  As well as a commission into the Medical Service Corps as a Lieutenant junior grade.

    Navy Physician Assistants

    Work in military hospitals and clinics on U.S. soil, overseas, aboard ships and with Special Operations units. PAs work hand in hand with supervising physicians and surgeons, provide a wide spectrum of services, handle primary-care issues or pursue a specific surgical subspecialty, oversee other members of the medical team, train in emerging need areas, such as emergency medicine, rural medicine and family practice. Those are just a few of the things one could do as a Navy Physician Assistant.

    Application Requirements

    The Physician Assistant Program is offered to active duty Navy and Marine Corps personnel as a part of the Medical Service Corps In-Service Procurement Program (MSCIPP). Application requirements are:

    1. Navy or Marine Corps E-5 thru E-9 (E-4 waivers considered on a case-to-case basis)
    2. Under 42 by commissioning
    3. Complete SAT with a score of 1000 (Math 460)
    4. US Citizen or naturalized US Citizen
    5. No NJP within in the three years preceding application
    6. Meet PFA Standards (outlined in  OPNAV 6110.1J)
    7. Pass pre-commissioning physical
    8. Meet security clearance requirements
    9. 60 semester hours prior to application (30 of those hours must be in residence training (classroom) at the acceptable course level)

    All the above information is outlined in detail in  OPNAVINST 1420.1b

    More information can be found at: Medical Service Corps Program MSCIPP/PA

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Amphibious Task Force Expeditionary Strike Group Surgeon

    This course provides senior-ranking Navy Medical Department Officers with training in amphibious operations, expeditionary warfare, and associated operational health service support training. Upon graduation, Medical Corps Officers will be prepared to serve effectively as a Senior Medical Advisor to a Task Force/Expeditionary Strike Group Commander, eligible for assignment as a CATF/ESG Surgeon and Officer in Charge of a Fleet Surgical Team. Satisfies MAP requirements for Echelon III Command and Control.

    Active duty and Reserve Navy Medical Corps Officers (21XX), 0-4 and above, are eligible for this training, and should have previous operational experience. The course is also open to a limited number of Dental Officers (22XX), Medical Service Corps Officers (23XX), Nurse Corps Officers (29XX), and qualified members of foreign navies.

    Most qualified candidates, selected, who are not slated to report to an Amphibious Medical Department, or similar Operational Medical Department Officer billet position, will need to obtain local funding or attend in a no-cost status. Reservist nominees selected for attendance will be funded by the Navy Reserve. Candidates from foreign navies are eligible to attend.

    • Location: Surface Warfare Medical Institute, San Diego, CA
    • Point of contact: SWMI Fleet Training Officer: usn.san-diego.navmedotcswmica.mbx.fleet-training@mail.mil .
    • Course dates:  First 2 full weeks every April.
    • Seats: Class size limited to 30 students
    • NOBC/Subspecialty Code Earned:  Senior physicians (CDR or above) successfully completing the course will be eligible for the CATF Surgeon AQD - 6OR, identifying qualifications, skills and knowledge required to perform the duties of a CATF/ESG Surgeon.
    • Security Classification: Unclassified
    • Course Length: 10 training days
    • CIN #B-6A-1000 CDP #630C
    • CATF-S-SAN DIEGO COURSE SCHEDULE
    • Staffing Requirements: A course coordinator arranges for subject matter experts to present lesson topics.  Medical Department officers and enlisted personnel currently active within the surface community also provide course presentations, as do past and present CATF Surgeons, Fleet Surgical Team leaders, and other service members.
    • Curriculum Approval Authority: Bureau of Medicine and Surgery
    • Quota Control: Surface Warfare Medical Institute
    • Implementation Date: October 1995
    • Primary Mode of Instruction: Group-based
    • Instruments and Procedures for measuring student performance: Graduates in CATF Surgeon billets and their supervisors are surveyed 8-12 months after the course.
    • Personnel Physical Requirements: Must be physically qualified for sea duty in accordance with the Manual of the Medical Department.
    • Continuing Medical Education Credit (CME): Students earn Category 1 CME hours
    • Related and/or Follow-On-Training: None

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Surface Warfare Medical Officer Indoctrination

    The Surface Warfare Medical Officer Indoctrination Course (SWMOIC) is a three week introductory program for Medical Corps Officers assigned to the surface fleet as Ships Medical Officers or Senior Medical Officers. The curriculum introduces them to the administrative duties as the department head of a ship, preventive and occupational medicine programs, and health promotions issues, humanitarian operations and medical evacuation. Clinical topics of special interest include heat and cold injuries, burn management, orthopedic trauma, triage, chemical and biological warfare. Students will also be trained in shipboard firefighting, Helo egress, and damage control as part of their preparations for shipboard duty.

    • Locations:
      •  Surface Warfare Medical Institute, Building 14, Naval Medical Center San Diego/Naval Base San Diego.
      • Naval Medical Center Portsmouth/Norfolk Naval Shipyard.
    • Point of contact: Contact LCDR Robert Wishmeyer at (619) 532-5949 or  Robert.Wishmeyer@med.navy.mil
    • Classes/yr: Course is offered once a year in July
    • Seats/yr: Class size is dependent upon fleet needs, but averages about 25 students

    Registration

    Most students will be ordered to attend the course enroute to their first fleet assignment. Others who feel the course would be beneficial to them should contact SWMI at 619-532-5857/6195. Submit a nomination letter through your chain of command. Provide command address, candidates rank, full name, title, designator, SSN, PRD, work and home phone numbers, e-mail address. The first two weeks of the SWMOIC course are the same as the SWMDOIC course. The last week is the actual SWMOIC portion which is for Medical Corps Officers only.
     
    ***ALL STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN THE SWMOIC COURSE ON THE NAVY MEDICINE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER WEBSITE.https://education.mods.army.mil/NavyCME/Default.aspx THE COURSE OPENS UP TO REGISTRATION ABOUT ONE MONTH BEFORE THE COURSE COMMENCES***
     
    CME: Attending the SWMOIC Course will entitle you up to 65.0 hours of Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit:
    1. The Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC) accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    2. NMPDC designates this educational activity for Category 1 credit toward the American Medical Association Physician's Recognition Award (AMAPRA).
    3. NMPDC takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.
    4. NMPDC certifies non-physicians who participate in this educational activity.
    • NOBC/SUBSPECIALTY CODE EARNED: The AQD - 6OB, Shipboard Assignment, will be assigned upon completion of shipboard tour.
    • SECURITY CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified.
    • COURSE LENGTH: 15 training days.
    • CIN #: B-6A-2300
    • STAFFING: The Surface Warfare Medical Institute arranges for subject matter specialists to present lesson topics. Those subject matter experts are selected specifically for the course topic. Medical officers currently active within the surface community and other Service branch members are also asked to provide presentations. The number of subject matter specialists required to present the course will vary with each course location and with current events.
    • CURRICULUM APPROVAL AUTHORITY: Bureau of Medicine and Surgery
    • QUOTA CONTROL: Surface Warfare Medical Institute
    • PRIMARY MODE OF INSTRUCTION: Group-paced
    •  INSTRUMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR MEASURING STUDENT PERFORMANCE:  Graduates and their supervisors are surveyed 8-12 months after the course on the individual’s performance.

    Schedule:

    SWMOIC WEST - SAN DIEGO

    Class # FY 16
    Convene
    Graduate
    16010
    7/5/2016
    7/22/2016

    SWMOIC EAST - PORTSMOUTH

    Class # FY 16
    Convene
    Graduate
    16010
    7/5/2016
    7/22/2016

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Surface Warfare Medical Department Officer Indoctrination

    The Surface Warfare Medical Department Officer Indoctrination Course (SWMDOIC) is designed to give Nurse Corps, Medical Service Corps and Medical Corps Officers an orientation to the fleet. It covers the mission of the Navy, medical assets of surface vessels, and overview of administration including inspections, supply, maintenance, records and correspondence. There is an introduction to the preventive and occupational health programs of a ship, medical regulating and patient evacuation. This course fills the training prerequisite for the Surface Warfare Medical Department Officer Qualification.

    The course is open to active duty medical, nurse and medical service corps officers within eight months of reporting to a ship, a Fleet Surgical Team, or a USMC unit that will deploy with an Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG). Reserve candidates must actively drill with fleet commands or have participated in fleet medical exercises.

    • Location: The course is offered in San Diego, CA in December and July. Also offered in Portsmouth/Norfolk in July each year.
    • Seats: 17 Active Duty and 3 Reserve
    • Registration:
      • Active Duty: Contact LCDR Robert Wishmeyer at (619) 532-5949 or Robert.Wishmeyer@med.navy.mil
      • Reserve: Contact local reserve command.
      • Provide command address, candidates rank, full name, title, designator, SSN, PRD, work and home phone numbers, e-mail address
    • Schedule
      • 6-17 July, 2015   San Diego, CA
      • 6-17 July, 2015   Portsmouth, VA
      • 30 Nov - 11 Dec, 2015   San Diego, CA
      • 30 Nov - 11 Dec, 2015   Portsmouth, VA
    • SWMDOIC Welcome Aboard

    CME: Attending the SWMDOIC Course will entitle you to Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit as follows:

    1. The Navy Medicine Professional Development Center (NMPDC) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    2. NMPDC designates this educational activity for Category 1 credit toward the American Medical Association Physician’s Recognition Award (AMAPRA).
    3. NMPDC takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity.
    4. NMPDC certifies non-physicians that participate in this educational activity.

    Schedule:

    SWMDOIC WEST - SAN DIEGO

    Class # FY 16
    Convene
    Graduate
    16010
    11/30/2015
    12/11/2015
    16020
    7/5/2016
    7/22/2016

    SWMDOIC EAST - PORTSMOUTH

    Class # FY 16
    Convene
    Graduate
    16010
    11/30/2015
    12/11/2015
    16020
    7/5/2016
    7/22/2016

    For more information about SWMI and the training we offer click HERE

Medical Regulating(MEDREG)

    Medical Regulating Course and Patient Movement Course (MRC/PMC), Course Control Numbers: CDP: 652 V and CIN: B6I-2311

    Description: Duration: 2 1/2 days. Provides students with the knowledge and skills required to function as a Medical Regulating Team (MRT) and Patient Evacuation Team (PET) members. The course provides techniques of medical regulating, patient movement, operations, Health Service Support assets, planning, and communications unique to Navy and Marine Corps, as well as the joint operating arena. Upon completion of training, participants will receive a Certificate, Page 13, and the 2nd Edition Medical Regulating/Patient Movement Reference Tool CD. Priority seating available for personnel assigned to the operating forces, or one of the following mobilization platforms:

    • Satisfies MAP requirements for Medical Regulating
    • Fleet Marine Force (FMF)
    • Roles of a Patient Evacuation Officer & Members of Patient Evacuation Team
    • Casualty Receiving and Treatment Ships (CRTS)
    • Hospital Ships (T-AH)
    • Fleet Hospitals (FH)
    • OCONUS MTFs

    Note: Selected training site commands must provide administrative support for the facilitators. SWMI funds instructors only. Commands desiring to sponsor/fund a class should contact the Surface Warfare Medical Institute, Medical Regulating Course Program Manager, HMCS (SW/FMF/AW) Troy A. Bojorquiz (troy.bojorquiz@med.navy.mil) at least six weeks prior to desired convening date. Hosting command's POC must provide primary and alternate dates for training. Attendance must be at minimum of 15 students.

    Sponsor

    Surface Warfare Medicine Institute, Detachment of the Navy Medicine Operational Training Center (NMOTC)

    Funding

    Candidates must be funded by Parent command.

    Application

    Via Chain of Command to the Surface Warfare Medicine Institute, Navy Medicine Operational Training Center Detachment.

    Utilization

    For E-3 and above who will be reporting as members of the Medical Regulating and Patient Evacuation Teams in support of Fleet Surgical Teams, Navy and Marine Corps Medical Units serving afloat or overseas.

Operational Medicine Symposia

Special Operations Combat Medic Course(SOCMC)

    Special Operations Combat Medic Course

    Prerequisites for the Special Operations Combat Medic Course

    COURSE DATA PAGE

    1. COURSE: The goal of the Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM) course is to train and qualify selected enlisted members to manage trauma patients, manage patients prior to medical evacuation, and provide basic medical care to team members. The course provide training in Basic Life Support/Automatic External Defibrillation (AED); pharmaceutical calculations; anatomy; physiology; pathophysiology; medical terminology; basic physical exam techniques; medical documentation; pharmacology; basic airway management; medical patient assessment; advanced airway management; patient management skills; pre-hospital trauma emergencies and care; tactical combat casualty care skills; operating room procedures; minor surgical skills; NREMT-Basic examination; obstetrics/gynecology and pediatric emergencies; cardiac pharmacology; Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS); EMT Paramedic clinical rotation and field internship consists of a 2-week hospital rotation in the emergency department, labor and delivery, surgical intensive care, pediatric emergency department, operating room, and a 2-week ambulance rotation with an assignment to an Advanced Life Support EMS unit responsible for responding to a variety of 911 emergency calls; USSOCOM EMT-Paramedic exam; care of the trauma patient in a field environment; preventive medicine; Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) casualty care, and nursing care; 30 hours of clinical rotations in clinics located on Fort Bragg, NC, conducting sick call under the supervision of a physician or physician's assistant.
    2. COURSE LENGTH: 26 weeks
    3. LOCATION TAUGHT:
    School School Location Course Course Title
    331 FORT BRAGG, NORTH CAROLINA 28307-5000 300-ASIW1 SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMBAT MEDIC

    STUDENT DATA

    1. PERSONNEL PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS: Must be physically qualified for transfer in accordance with Article 15-30 of the Manual of the Medical Department (MANMED) and Chapter 7.01 of the Enlisted Transfer Manual (TRANSMAN). Members requiring medical attention shall not be transferred to this school.
    2. PREREQUISITE TRAINING: Assignment to a USSOCOM Naval or Marine Corps service component command.
    3. PERSONNEL AND RATINGS ELIGIBLE: Naval Special Warfare Hospital Corpsman, Special Operators, Force Reconnaissance Hospital Corpsman, MARSOC Hospital Corpsman, and Special Warfare Combat Crewmen are eligible upon recommendation and selection from their command.
    4. NEC EARNED: NEC-5392 Special Ops Medic
    5. RELATED AND/OR FOLLOW-ON TRAINING:
      1. Special Operations Independent Duty Corpsman (SOIDC) 011-F68
      2. Special Operations Forces Medical Sergeants Sustainment Program (SOFMSSP) 300-F21

    UNIT SYNOPSIS

    Special Operations Combat Medic Course (SOCM), takes a student with little to no knowledge of medicine and begins teaching him medical fundamentals. This provides a base on which to build upon as the ensuing modules become increasingly more difficult, with the end product to the combatant commander being a trauma specialist trained in warfare related injuries. The Force Reconnaissance Corpsman receives NEC-8427. Upon completion of SOCM, E-4 and below Corpsmen and medics move on to an operational unit as a Special Operations Combat Medic, while E-5 and above Corpsmen and Medics will go to an operational unit or have the opportunity to attend the Special Operations Independent Duty Corpsman course (SOIDC).

    Med Fundamentals (7 Weeks)

    This is the first section of training. It covers pharmacology, pharmaceutical calculations, anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, medical terminology, basic physical exam techniques, and medical documentation. During the anatomy and physiology section, our students are privileged to use the cadaver lab located in the schoolhouse facility.

    SOCM Trauma Modules (7 Weeks)

    This training covers AHA Basic Life Support, advance airway management, patient management skills, pre-hospital trauma emergencies and care, advance trauma tasks/skills, pre-hospital trauma emergencies and care, advanced trauma skills, operating room procedures, and minor surgical skills. Students take the NREMT-Basic examination after completing these subjects. Included in the Trauma Modules is the Advanced Tactical Practitioner phase. This covers obstetrics and pediatric emergencies, cardiac pharmacology, training in combat trauma management, PEPP, and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS).

    Clinical Internship: (4 Weeks)

    The students then go on the -Paramedic clinical rotation and field internship at one of several Level I Trauma Centers on the east coast. This consists of 2 weeks of ambulance, 2 weeks of hospital. The hospital training consists of rotations in the emergency department, labor and delivery, surgical intensive care, pediatric emergency department, and operating room. Ambulance training consists of assignment to an Advanced Life Support EMS unit responsible for responding to a variety of 911 emergency calls.

    Military Medicine: (3 Weeks)

    The last phase of training is conducting Sick Call procedures. This covers the care of routine walk-in patients under the supervision of a physician or physician’s assistant at one of the many clinics at FT. Bragg.


    For more information about NSOMI and the training we offer click HERE

Special Operations Independent Duty Corpsman Course (SOIDC)

    COURSE DATA PAGE

    1. COURSE: The goal of the Special Operations Independent Duty Corpsman (SOIDC) is to train and qualify selected Petty Officers in the advanced skills and knowledge required to perform duties as a SEAL medic or a Force Reconnaissance Hospital Corpsman. The SOIDC course is a fast-paced approach to long term care of active duty and indigenous personnel from all aspects of medicine, from the first responder to the surgeon/anesthetist in the operating room. The course includes live tissue training in extended care of the trauma patient in a field environment in addition to mass casualty, military triage system, medical mission planning, medical threat, preventive medicine, and physical examination. The student receives training in veterinary, dental, laboratory, medical diseases and case studies, nursing, initial and long-term wound care, Unconventional Warfare hospital, surgical procedures, pre-anesthesia, anesthesia, post anesthesia care, nursing care, records and reports, radiology, and central materials supply.
    2. COURSE LENGTH: 24 weeks
    3. LOCATION TAUGHT:
    School School Location Course Course Title
    331 FORT BRAGG, NORTH CAROLINA 28307-5000 011-F68 SPECIAL OPERATIONS INDEPENDENT DUTY CORPSMAN

    STUDENT DATA

    1. PERSONNEL PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS: Must be physically qualified for transfer in accordance with Article 15-30 of the Manual of the Medical Department (MANMED) and Chapter 7.01 of the Enlisted Transfer Manual (TRANSMAN). Members requiring medical attention shall not be transferred to this school.
    2. PREREQUISITE TRAINING: Assignment to a USSOCOM Naval or Marine Corps service component command.
    3. PERSONNEL AND RATINGS ELIGIBLE: Naval Special Warfare Hospital Corpsman, Special Operators, Force Reconnaissance Hospital Corpsman, MARSOC Hospital Corpsman, and Special Warfare Combat Crewmen are eligible upon recommendation and selection from their command after completing Special Operations Medic Course (300-F8).
    4. NEC EARNED: (NEC-8403) Force Reconnaissance Hospital Corpsman
    5. RELATED AND/OR FOLLOW-ON TRAINING:
      1. Special Operations Forces Medical Sergeants Sustainment Program (SOFMSSP) 300-F21

    UNIT SYNOPSIS

    Laboratory (3 Weeks)

    This class is a down and dirty introduction of being a Laboratory technician. Most aspect of laboratory are covered to include: Microscopic studies, Hematology, Parasitological, Urinalysis, and Stool studies

    Medicine (5 Weeks)

    Disease Assessment & Management. During this phase you learn physical exams, casting, disease recognition, and much more

    Surgery/Anesthesia/Nursing (4 Weeks)

    This phase covers Pre and Post-Operative Patient Care including S.O.A.P notes and Records and Reports

    Dental (1 Week)

    Anesthesia, Extractions, Fillings

    Special Operations Clinical Training (4 Weeks)

    During this 30-day deployment to Wilford Hall Medical Center, located on Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Here, students receive clinical training/experience and are evaluated on their ability to apply patient assessment, management, and care skills in various clinical settings. The SOIDC students rotate through Obstetric/Gynecological, Emergency Department, Labor and Delivery, Surgery, Dermatology, Pediatrics, Orthopedics, Radiology, Preventive Medicine/Community Health, and the Outpatient/Family Practice Clinic.

    Guerilla Hospital & Methods of Instruction (1 Week)

    Veterinary (2 Weeks)

    Herd Management, Food Inspection


    For more information about NSOMI and the training we offer click HERE

Special Operations Combat Medic Skills Sustainment Course (SOCMSSC)

    Course Data Page

    1. COURSE: Navy graduates of the SOCM and SOIDC course are required to maintain their skill sets, certifications in BLS, ACLS, ATP, and clinical skill sets. Special Operations Combat Medical Sergeants Sustainment Course (SOCMSSC) is a two-week course provided which accommodates all recertification training. The Navy SOCM and SOIDC is required to attend this two-week training bi-annually.
    2. COURSE LENGTH: 2 weeks
    3. LOCATION TAUGHT:
    School School Location Course Course Title
    331 Fort Bragg, North Carolina
    28307-5000
    300-F21 Special Operations Forces Medical Sergeants Sustainment Course

    Student Data

    1. PERSONNEL PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS: Must be physically qualified for transfer in accordance with Article 15-30 of the Manual of the Medical Department (MANMED) and Chapter 7.01 of the Enlisted Transfer Manual (TRANSMAN). Members requiring medical attention shall not be transferred to this school.
    2. PREREQUISITE TRAINING: Students Must:

      1. Have graduated from course: 300-F8 (Special Operations Combat Medic)
      2. Have graduated from course: 011-F68 (Special Operations Independent Duty Corpsman)
    3. PERSONNEL AND RATINGS ELIGIBLE: A SOF volunteer enlisted service member with a primary duty specialty of Special Operations Combat Medic, Navy SEAL & RECON Special Operations Combat Medic (NEC 8492/8427), Navy SEAL and RECON Special Operations Independent Duty Corpsman (SOIDC) (NEC 8491/8403), or an enlisted or officer instructor in the SOCM or SOIDC course and be assigned to one of the following: USSOCOM, JSOC, USASOC, NAVSPECWARCOM, AFSOC, or any of their subordinate units or agencies. Service members must be a graduate of one of the following: the SOCM (300-F8) Course or SOIDC Course. Service members will attend the course once every 2 years to receive Special Operations combat medical refresher training.
    4. NEC EARNED: None
    5. RELATED AND/OR FOLLOW-ON TRAINING: None

    Unit Synopsis

    Week One: Week one covers refresher training for PALS, ACLS, BLS, TCCC, and some "hands on" emergency training.

    Week Two: Covers Basic Trauma Skills, PHTLS Review, WMD, Environmental emergencies, Field Training Exercise, and General Medicine.

    Any questions contact MSG McNEal/TSgt Halcome @ DSN: 236-8202/COM 910-396-8202

    *indicates (Reports on Monday, not Sunday)

    SPECIAL OPERATIONS PARAMEDIC MEDICAL SKILLS SUSTAINMENT COURSE FY-09 2E-F223/300-F22 (CT)


    For more information about NSOMI and the training we offer click HERE