TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a general term used to describe a number of different types of injury to the brain. A person can sustain a TBI when an external force is applied to the brain and the force is significant enough to change the way the brain functions. Wounded, ill, or injured (WII) service members who have sustained a traumatic brain injury including a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion) and who continue to experience chronic, persistent symptoms can face challenges that affect daily living. These can include physical, psychological, emotional, or social challenges as well as cognitive challenges such as remembering things or thinking things through. Additionally, a WII service member may also be coping or recovering from another wound, illness, or injury while managing TBI symptoms. Positively managing TBI symptoms, modifying health behaviors that can make symptoms worse, mask other symptoms or conditions, or delay recovery, and identifying when additional help is needed are all important steps during the recovery process that can enhance overall quality of life. Our resources can assist WII service members and those who support them in positively navigating these challenges and help service members move towards optimal physical, psychological, and emotional well-being.

Information and Facts

TBI Symptoms and Positive Coping

TBI and Co-Occurring Conditions

Additional Information and Tools

If you or someone you know is in-crisis, seek immediate assistance. Do not leave the person alone. Call 911, seek help from a healthcare professional and/or call the Military Crisis Line. Chaplains, corpsmen, healthcare professionals at your MTF or branch clinic, and your local Fleet and Family Support Services can also provide assistance.